X

Watches

Samsung’s Exynos 7420 processor headed to round Orbis smartwatch

Samsung’s new round smartwatch that we’ve seen in patent drawings (dubbed Orbis) is sure to be a luxury smartwatch for those that don’t want to compromise on looks and functionality. But what about the power behind this new luxury timepiece? Will raw power turn tech heads?

Samsung seems to be prepared to answer that question in the affirmative: according to a reputable source, Samsung is bringing its Exynos 7420 processor (the same one placed in the Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 edge) to its round smartwatch. Keep in mind that the Exynos 7420 processor is an octa-core, as opposed to the dual-core Qualcomm Snapdragon processor found in Samsung’s latest smartwatch, the Gear S.

What is the purpose behind this? Why place an octa-core processor chip into a small, mobile gadget like a smartwatch? The answer, in two words, is “battery life.” Samsung’s Gear S achieves 1-2 days of battery life for normal usage, while users who utilize the device’s Power Saving Mode can achieve 3-4 days of battery life with light usage. The Power Saving Mode on the Gear S does what the Ultra Power Saving Mode does on the Galaxy S5, Note 4, and now S6 and S6 edge: it turns off the screen and all functions you’re not using in order to conserve battery life.

If Samsung does place the octa-core processor into the new smartwatch, buyers will have 4-5 days of battery with moderate usage instead of light usage (provided most of the cores are disabled at all times). One-week battery life has been the desire of smartwatch buyers in the smartwatch’s young history, with only Pebble being the manufacturer able to meet consumer demand (with an E-ink, not an OLED, display). Apple’s below-average, 18-hour promise in the Apple Watch leaves much to be desired, notwithstanding the Apple Watch’s price tag.

The Galaxy S6 and S6 edge have taken consumers by surprise. And for those who buy Samsung regardless, longer battery life will produce the same optimistic response. The round Orbis smartwatch is expected to debut at the CTIA in Las Vegas, Nevada (Sept. 9-11, 2015) and, like its predecessor, will run on Tizen.

ViaSource

9 Comments

Sign in »

9
Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

stanry77
stanry77

I am exciting to see Samsung produce custom SoC for its new Smartwatch which is efficient and extended battery life for its newly upcoming SW. I understand that in the company point of view where everyone out there are testing water and trying to make use of whatever SoC which is available out there for the new SW. That is very natural thing to do so. So they compete on the external design but none having good reasonable battery life that could be shout about except Pebble Watch. There are millions of wearer for Pebble, bcoz of goodbattery life at… Read more »

stanry77
stanry77

Whatever CPU combination or disabling the other non usable cores. First thing first, does it consumed more battery? Anyway, does it make a lot of difference in term of power consumption having a specific SoC that it is for Smart Watch? There is also concern that 8 cores Exynos 7420 could occupy space in the watch. At least I know once the SoC goes 14nm, it is definitely power saving for smart watch compare to 28nm, 32nm and even more so to 40nm. With these energy efficiency, the smart watch can go longer miles. Anyway, smart watch do not do… Read more »

kronicle
kronicle

Apparently there are lots of misquotes clouding the real source article on that Korean site. So I’ll try to clear it up for you. They are first of all touting Samsung latest 14nm FinFet advanced 1st ever ARM fabrication process. Naturally they also mention that Samsung is already testing and ramping up 10nm FinFet. This I assume is because Samsung has leaped over Intel by using Graphene technology on their next move in 10nm and smaller vs Intel’s using Gallium instead of silicon or graphene. Which will only get them to just announced 7nm and eventually 5nm. While Samsung (with… Read more »

stanry77
stanry77

Hi Samsung, this time round I have to applaud you of breaking the new norm. Too bad I wasn’t a Tech Blogger yet. Good to hear that u are putting an advanced SoC to you our new Watch, that will greatly increase the battery life. Due to limited space in the Watch, does the 8 core Exynos 7 processor take up space? Having the watch last 48hrs or more for normal use is welcome. Also try to have Ultra Power Saving mode u implemented in S5, Note 4 and S6. That will turn the watch to run an extra miles… Read more »

emieltess
emieltess

Wouldn’t it be something like a Exynos 7220 or 7120 with 4× a53 and 2× a57 or even 2x a53 and 1x a57? Atleast that would make much more sense in a smartwatch than fully enabled 7420. Also I don’t think a 300-500mah battery would like a fully enabled 7420.

magmar100
magmar100

Then why not simply use a quad core cortex a53? You do not need the high performance a57 cores in a smartwatch ^^

But why not designing a SoC extra for smartwatches? Like a dual core cortex a53 combined with a extreme power saving single core that runs in standby and when you only look at the time.

I think that would be the best deal for battery usage. Dual Core + Battery Saving Core

emieltess
emieltess

An important thing to know is that the a53 core can only perform less complicated tasks, so having atleast a single a57 backing it up is a must for complex calculations.

emieltess
emieltess

… Even if that a57 is running at only 500Mhz it is still more efficient at those complicated calculations than high clocked a53’s

harryisme
harryisme

Certainly seems like overkill, but if Samsung have a stockpile of low yielding SoC’s they can repurpose them by disabling multiple cores and the 14nm FinFet chipset should allow for longer battery life, and with a more powerful modern SoC inside it would perform tasks faster and go back into powersaving mode quicker.

It’s an interesting idea, one I’m unsure will actually happen but it would certainly give reason for the competition to be worried.