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Samsung shares a video detailing how its new Turbo Speed Technology (TST) works

On Monday, Samsung unveiled the latest smartphone in its Galaxy J lineup, the Galaxy J2 Pro. The handset was developed with the intention of succeeding in the areas where the Galaxy J2 (2016) didn’t hit the mark. To do this, the firm bundled an extra 0.5GB of RAM on the device and doubled the amount internal storage. It also integrated its new Turbo Speed Technology (TST) RAM management engine, which it claims is capable of loading “ applications up to 40 percent faster than a unit with double the RAM capacity.” Unfortunately, at the time of announcement, it was unclear how the utility functioned, but the company has taken to its YouTube channel to share a short video detailing what goes on when TST is running behind the scenes.

Check it out below:

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superjdb22
superjdb22

If this were a high-end feature it would be introduced with the Note 7. From what I understand though, it is a form of memory management to squeeze better performance out of a device with not enough RAM. The processor can be tasked with compression and more aggressive process management, because it is the amount of RAM that is slowing the phone down. A device with enough RAM simple wouldn’t benefit from it, since the amount of RAM is not the bottleneck. As one bottleneck is eliminated an other one will obviously show itself, but in the case of high-end… Read more »

warlockba
warlockba

Basically writing decent / good software (small memory footprint software), is not a technology but a skill; also most likely it implies using less “high resolution images” in these native applications, to reduce memory footprint. And the second thing is an improved garbage collector – which you will not want on your high end devices, as they will kill background tasks quite fast – making multitasking less possible. The de-cluttering of the RAM might be useful – up to some point, but it is also due to the more aggressive garbage collector. So this so called new technology is “better… Read more »

Tannet
Tannet

A lot of assumptions here. First, iconds are so small in size that there’s little to save there to begin with. But images in general don’t have to be lower resolution to save space, compression helps too. And before anyone jumps the gun, compression doesn’t need to be directly visible either.

As for the garbage collector theory, the video actually highlights that the aim is to reduce native apps running in the background, to allow more multitasking with other non system apps.

warlockba
warlockba

Yea, with compression you are right – but when a image is moved to video memory for displaying it stays in memory uncompressed. That’s why the graphics chip “eats” a part of the memory of the phone by default, depending on what resolution you use (and why generally graphic cards have dedicated RAM in PCs – among other reasons). Yeah I did not want to get that far into detail, as it is a lot more to that – selective aggressive garbage collection then 🙂 But still, none of the two are a “technology”, that’s what I wanted to underline.… Read more »

henshiel
henshiel

Looking forward that Samsung will soon incorporate this feature to their high-end devices like the S7 and the S7 edge.

mantaka
mantaka

What about top end phones… they would benefit from this too.