TV

Samsung targets LG’s OLED TVs for their burn-in problem

Samsung has a near-monopoly over mobile OLED panels in the market, and it is demonstrated well by the fact that Samsung is the sole supplier of OLED displays even for its arch rival’s iPhone X. The situation in the TV market is, however, different. Samsung has stopped making OLED TVs and started selling QLED TVs, while also investing in a more futuristic MicroLED technology.

On the other hand, LG’s long-term bets on OLED technology for TVs started yielding results with the company turning into a dominant force in the premium TV market, putting its critically acclaimed OLED TVs in direct competition with Samsung’s QLED TVs. Samsung seems to be feeling the heat from LG’s success with OLED TVs and is now reportedly resorting to marketing the downsides of OLED TVs to sell its QLED offerings.

LG is not happy with Samsung’s claims

A report in Business Korea says that LG Electronics in Thailand and Malaysia has recently sent official communication to the Samsung counterparts in these countries to stop the ad campaigns targeting the supposed burn-in problem in LG OLED TVs. LG Electronics is reportedly angry about a certain 10-year burn-in warranty ad by Samsung that lists the advantages of QLED TVs, claiming they are free from burn-in, unlike OLED TVs. The ad also apparently shows some pictures of OLED TVs with burned-in screens, along with citing burn-in test results from Rtings – a website which does extensive burn-in tests.

LG is not happy with Samsung claiming that all OLED TVs suffer from burn-in and alleges Samsung is misleading the customers with its advertisement. Samsung has reportedly refused to withdraw the ad by saying that it is not targeting LG TVs specifically but just trying to inform the customers about OLED TV problems in general. The report also states that LG Electronics is even considering legal recourse if Samsung refuses to withdraw the advertisement.

This is not the first time Samsung is targeting LG’s OLED TVs for burn-in issues. In August last year, Samsung had published an ad titled ‘QLED vs OLED: The 12-Hour Image Retention Test’ on its YouTube channel. The video compares image retention on a Samsung QLED TV and an LG OLED TV, where the former emerges victorious unscathed by burn-in. Samsung also published a blog post last year explaining the burn-in problem in OLED TVs and marketing its QLED TVs.

It’s a bit ironic for Samsung to target the problems of OLED panels as it is the largest supplier of mobile OLED panels in the market. Granted that the lifespan of most smartphones is less than a couple of years and so burn-in, which is related to long periods of usage, is a bigger problem on TVs that are expected to last much longer. Still, it comes across as a sign of Samsung’s insecurity when it focuses too much on the flaws of OLED TVs instead of highlighting the strengths of its QLED technology.

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dmoody
dmoody

Funny Samsung making these claims, but on page 16 of all their manuals is instructions to their customers on how to avoid burn-in on their displays!! Seems a little hypocritical… All types of panel displays can get burn in if exposed to static images for long periods of time.

Horus Osiris
Horus Osiris

Nope, QLED doesn’t

Horus Osiris
Horus Osiris

QLED = THE BEST

Bobbingalong
Bobbingalong

Just recently upgraded my TV after many years and did look at the Samsung Vs lg and in the end the lg oled 65e7 was the winner. It had much better picture quality and sound. The TV has great software to handle idle screen burn in and tbh by the time there are problems maybe 7 or 8 years down the line. It would be easy to just buy a new one. Samsung doesn’t advertise about their phone screens in danger of burn in but phone life expectancy is around 3 to 4 years before people upgrade. Though some upgrade… Read more »

iamnigeloke
iamnigeloke

If anyone were to bother to do the math, TVs have longer screen-on time than our phones on average. Worse still, channel operators have static logos places on the upper corners of the television, and after prolonged hours of screen-on time, the ghosting effect from the logos arises. My old Plasma panel from Samsung also suffered burn-ins on the upper portion of the panel after 8 years of use. It was a gradual problem though, but it was worse since 2 years ago. I’m still not buying myself into QLED/OLED until 4K broadcasting starts to show up (and even better… Read more »

djcbs
djcbs

It’s desperation. Imagine if Sony – do justify the use of bloody LCDs in their Xperias – started doing ads about burn-in in Galaxy phones? Anyway, I have LG OLED TVs and not only do they come with software to prevent burn-in, they have tools to “clean” the screen if they start to show up. However, for them to show up you’d have to have the TV constantly turned on on the same channel and that channel needs to have its logo constantly in the same place. Otherwise you’ll not get any “burn-in” as there are no static elements in… Read more »

SteveTud
SteveTud

Hi 🙂

SteveTud
SteveTud

I like them big tellys, i just can’t afford one