Phone

Samsung executive hypes Galaxy Fold’s UX and multitasking capabilities

After years of buildup, Samsung finally launched the much-awaited foldable smartphone, Galaxy Fold, at it its Unpacked event in San Francisco last week. Despite announcing the price and availability, the company, however, didn’t allow the press to play with the device to realize how it feels and works. As the curiosity about the device continues, the company has been posting bits and pieces of new information to keep the hype intact.

A few days back, the Korean company quietly released (now taken down) a four-minute video of the Galaxy Fold on its YouTube channel, giving us the most detailed look at the device so far. Continuing the hype, Samsung Newsroom has now posted an interview of Eui-suk Chung, Executive VP and Head of Software and AI at Samsung Mobile, where he talks about Galaxy Fold’s UX and multitasking capabilities. Frankly, nothing substantially new about the Galaxy Fold is mentioned in the interview, but there are some interesting bits about third-party app support for App Continuity and Multi-Active Window features.

To a question about if all apps support App Continuity and Multi-Active Window, the Samsung executive is rather cautious in his answer. While saying that the company has worked closely with Google and other partners, he added, “Support for App Continuity and Multi-Active Window will vary based on the application and the developer’s adherence with Google policies and guidelines.” From his statement, it appears some apps may support these features better than others.

Talking about the development of Galaxy Fold, Eui-suk Chung said that it took eight years for the company to turn the flexible display prototypes from 2011 into a meaningful product. He also said, with the introduction of the Galaxy Fold, ‘roll-able’ and ‘stretch-able’ device designs no longer seem impossible.

Galaxy Fold supports App Continuity and Multi-Active Window

The interview is accompanied by an illustration video where Samsung shows how the Galaxy Fold’s App Continuity and Multi-Active Window features work and how they are useful. The appeal of the Fold’s software is in, what Samsung calls, App Continuity. Simply put, App Continuity transfers an active app on the cover display to the main display when the Galaxy Fold is opened. Similarly, an active app on the main display transitions seamlessly to the cover display when the Fold is closed, enabling frictionless movement of activities from one display to the other.

Multi-Active Window, on the other hand, as the name suggests, allows Fold users to run up to three apps simultaneously on the main screen. That’s one app more than what’s currently allowed on Galaxy smartphones.

It is worth nothing Samsung is a bit ingenious when it comes to the cover display size in the video. The actual size of the outer display is smaller than what the video tries to portray.

  • Model: SM-F900F
  • Dimensions: Unfolded: 160.9 x 117.9 x 6.9 mm Folded: 160.9 x 62.9 x 15.5 mm
  • Display: 7,3" (185.4mm) Super AMOLED
  • CPU: Qualcomm Snapdragon 855
  • Camera: 16 MP, CMOS F2.2 & 12MP, CMOS F1.5/F2.4Wide & 12MP, CMOS F2.4 Telephoto

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stondec
stondec

Just add an S Pen, make it thinner and more pocketable and you have my business.

fcaroll
fcaroll

I hoped they would hype the UI performance, smoothness and lightness but it seems it’s still not the time

siaho
siaho

I can’t keep myself to wonder, how much this all has to do with the gutted multitasking abilities on the note 9? Sure, the screen is smaller vs the fold when in tablet mode, but it was super easy to fast open a lot of apps in windows, move them around, minimise them, split screen them and whatnot. Now it’s all possible on paper, but 10 times slower to pull off to the point you will not use it as it will seriously hurt your productivity instead to improve it as it was on nougat/oreo. The note 9 was marketed… Read more »

Biransahin
Biransahin

It’s a case of getting used to it. We ran a small tutorial for all our engineers a few weeks ago when One UI arrived on our companies Note9 devices particularly as we have a few in-house designed apps. It’s different but pretty easy to use in some ways easier as One UI is snappier. Engineers are generally very adaptable very quickly, so it’s true that this might not apply to everyone. The learning curve can be different for some.

siaho
siaho

I am both engineer and android early adopter/developer + my hobby (and education) is in the tech/electronics field. But 10x for you judgment. Also I didn’t state that the new multi-window capabilities are hard to use (also roflmao if you need to run any kind of tutorial to engineers for such a basic thing), I said it takes a lot more steps to pull out basic stuffs that was available in samsung phones for years (and they were praised for). But let me give you an simple example (as really, I can give you quite a few): I watch youtube… Read more »

Biransahin
Biransahin

The reason for the tutorial was that a couple of our junior engineers had come from an iOS environment so they needed a run down on using it with our in-house apps. However, your contention that the new method of opening apps in multi window is more difficult is surprising. It is just as easy, it’s just different. As you have just described yourself, I’m surprised you find it difficult enough to adapt to that you had to comment about it in the first place.

siaho
siaho

It’s not difficult at all, takes a lot more steps and time to do the same vs oreo/nougat solution. I don’t care if it’s easy or difficult, I care for it to be fast and lead to better productivity in my usage patterns. I am the one surprised that you can’t differentiate between the ways to do a simple task that I just described. If you find it “the same” to have one way that will pause your video and then you will have to wait it buffer to start playing again vs uninterrupted video – ok. Or if you… Read more »

stondec
stondec

What’s so difficult to understand about the point Siaho is making?
He’s simply saying the Pie update is less intuitive and requires additional, unnecessary steps to perform the same tasks. In other words, Samsung downgraded the software experience instead of upgrading it. Simple enough?

gentux
gentux

This image of the outer display on the fold shows the #1 reason I don’t want it. It is so small and too narrow. But I might be a happy Fold 2 or Fold 3 user in a few years, who knows.

locarno
locarno

On video outer display is bigger.

gentux
gentux

I watched the Unpacked video stream and it looked tiny on there as well, i.e. only three icons in a row on home screen, well maybe the final device will be different. But for some reason Samsung doesn’t show off the outer display often, it’s always open on marketing images.

Biransahin
Biransahin

It is too small. Hopefully in later versions they will change it.

siaho
siaho

Yeah, I think this phone is mostly for the people that don’t really use it on the go, i.e. mainly calls. Then when they get home – unfolding to a full display.

I feel the same as you, the outer screen is just too small for my taste, but I can also see myself using similar concept in the future (when most likely it will be slimmer + bigger front display).