Phone

Samsung went against industry practice to self-test Galaxy Note 7 batteries

People are going to talk about the Galaxy Note 7’s battery crisis for years to come. This component forced Samsung to ditch what might have been one of its most popular flagship smartphones. The company is still trying to find out the cause of its $5.3 billion misery. According to a new report, Samsung went against the industry practice of having smartphone batteries tested at one of the 28 labs certified by the wireless industry trade group CTIA to ensure that they comply with the standards set by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. This is actually a requirement for companies that want to sell smartphones at major US carriers. Samsung decided to self-test the batteries instead.

CTIA certification requires a smartphone battery to be tested on its own as well as when it’s powering the device. The aim of these tests is to ascertain whether the batteries work properly while a phone is being charged or used for calls, which is when they’re most likely going to heat up a bit. Batteries are also put in high temperatures to simulate summer conditions so that potential overheating and combustion hazards can be discovered.

Samsung is currently the only major smartphone manufacturer to use its in-house battery testing facilities for CTIA certification. A spokesman for the company said that tests at its facilities didn’t reveal any problems with the Galaxy Note 7’s battery. Microsoft and Lenovo used to operate their own labs for CTIA certification but the trade group says that they both being closed. Samsung has been testing its smartphones at its own CTIA-certified lab since 2009 and this is only the first time that it has had this problem on such a massive scale.

The company is currently conducting an investigation into the entire Galaxy Note 7 fiasco. It’s yet to come up with an official explanation behind the fires, but the head of Samsung’s mobile business has assured customers that he will find out the cause at any cost and make it public to try and rebuild consumer trust in the world’s largest smartphone vendor.

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snathan
snathan

What is going on here? This is a non story. This article seems to lack research. Have your authors any brain? also Nokia tested, Nokia Investigates Exploding Cell Phones (Nov 14, 2003) -http://www.pcworld.com/article/113416/article.html

SamMobile is a bunch of iSheeps. Here’s the proof. They always campaign against Samsung (Apple media fake propaganda). ADNAN F. is an Apple iSheep. This site and its writers are iSheeps. SamMobile is the biggest money sucking website. Apple pays SamMobile for sabotaging Samsung.

Maybe you need to be educated a little more

Ionut Ciprian
Ionut Ciprian

I was thinking about this a long time ago! They should re-brand to iMobile or ScrApple. The biggest Samsung anti campaign.

Wizky911
Wizky911

Agree. Sammobile has some of the worst writers, but I love the site though. They need to focus on quality instead of being first to report. And get rid of like 3 writers

snathan
snathan

What is going on here? This is a non story. This article seems to lack research. Have your authors any brain? Check out Nokia also tested, Nokia Investigates Exploding Cell Phones (Nov 14, 2003) -http://www.pcworld.com/article/113416/article.html

SamMobile is a bunch of iSheeps. Here’s the proof. They always campaign against Samsung (Apple media fake propaganda). ADNAN F. is an Apple iSheep. This site and its writers are iSheeps. SamMobile is the biggest money sucking website. Apple pays SamMobile for sabotaging Samsung.

Maybe you need to be educated a little more

vbx
vbx

Ahh. this explains it. Those company lose out on $$$ they were suppose to receive for testing Samsung devices. So in return, they hired a few people to cause the device to explode and punish Samsung for it.

Samsung won’t make the same mistake.

Who benefits from this? Apple and CTIA. I guarantee these 2 are responsible.

Ice coffee
Ice coffee

Apple won’t be anywhere near this, they don’t need to be, they’re already making all the money in the world, and most customers are OS loyal. If this is some kind of industrial sabotage my money would be on malicious firmware planted by a rival Chinese phone manufacturer.

Apple and Samsung make all the mobile money, there is no point trying to topple Apple because their loyal customers will buy what ever horse crap they churn out. Topple Samsung however and every single android OEM in the world benefits.

Right now, all these OEM’s are fighting over market scraps.

vbx
vbx

Apple iPhone 6 and 7 both have history of exploding and catching on fire. But only Samsung is getting media attention for this?

I think CTIA is making Samsung an example to anyone who wishes to do their “own” battery testing.

championfoods
championfoods

Agree. If one is going to spout conspiracy theories, this one makes the most sense.