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Thread: LiteRemix XXLG1 based on Nexus / Hero355 (Old thread!)

  1. #101
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    Friends, do you think I should start a new thread for this issue?

    FYI,

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/0..._n_810415.html

    New Hack Turns Smartphones Into Covert Spying System

    The Huffington Post Amy Lee First Posted: 01/19/11 09:39 AM ET Updated: 05/25/11 07:25 PM ET

    Your phone is a covert spy device, secretly listening to and recording everything you say -- or at least, it could be, according to new research that has uncovered a smartphone hack affecting both Androids and iPhones.

    The auto-answer feature installed on most smartphones can be hacked to transform the phone into a listening machine, based on research by Ralf-Philipp Weinmann that shows a way hackers can break into the phone's baseband processor--which sends and receives radio signals on the cellular network--by exploiting bugs in the firmware of its radio chips.

    "I will demo how to use the auto-answer feature present in most phones to turn the telephone into a remote listening device," Weinmann told InfoWorld in an e-mail.

    Though previous cell phone security concerns have focused on the operating systems, Weinmann's research represents a new kind of hack--baseband hacking, an approach that requires some complicated set-up to function.

    The would-be hacker creates a fake cell phone tower to get the targeted phone to connect with it, at which point the fake tower would be able to transmit the bad code. Moreover, that code must be capable of running on the firmware, representing another level of hacker know-how necessary to run the trick.

    A new open source software called OpenBTS allows pretty much anybody to set up a cellular network radio tower. Back in the day, it would take tens of thousands of dollars to accomplish the same feat, making this sort of hacking basically impossible for the average hacker. This kind of hacking is also illegal, as intercepting phone calls over licensed frequencies is against federal law.

    Weinmann will unveil his hack at next month's Black Hat information security conference in Washington DC. His title for the presentation? "The Baseband Apocalypse."

  2. #102
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    http://www.itscolumn.com/2012/04/7-s...s-been-hacked/

    7 signs a smartphone has been hacked

    This is a guest post by Sam Narisi. If you are interested to guest post in this blog, just head over to the Guest Post Guidelines.

    As smartphones become more popular, more hackers are turning their attention to those mobile devices. Just as with computers, smartphones can be infected with viruses or spyware or otherwise be accessed by criminals to steal data or use the device for illegal means.

    One big IT security challenge is that hackers specialize in conducting stealth attacks that go unnoticed. And, mobile security is still in its infancy and not all applications will be able to detect every type of attack. That means many smartphone users may have a device that’s been compromised without them even realizing it.

    While the following symptoms can have a number of causes – including some legitimate apps – these are some potential warning signs that a smartphone has been hacked:

    1. Suspicious items on the phone bill

    One of the most common uses of mobile malware is to take control of a victim’s phone and use it to send text messages or make phone calls. Typically, the infected phone is made to automatically dial or message premium rate numbers. The victim’s phone bill is run up, and the criminals pocket the payments.

    The scam often continues for a while as users fail to notice the calls or sent messages when they review their phone bill. That’s especially the case for company-issued smartphones – if a device is used for a lot of business calls, a few extra charges resulting from a malware infection might not stand out.

    [28 Types of Computer Security Threats and Risks]

    2. Big changes in battery consumption

    One of the biggest drains on a smartphone’s battery life is the use of Wi-Fi or a mobile data connection to send and receive information.

    Therefore, a dramatic change in how much battery power a device uses is sometimes caused by the phone sending large amounts of data. It’s not always the case, but that might be because a virus is being used to transmit data from the device.

    Image: Stuart Miles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

    3. Big jumps in data use

    Another way to tell if a phone has been transmitting an unusual amount of information is simply to check data usage stats from the wireless carrier.

    However, users don’t often check their data usage unless they go over their monthly allotment and have to pay overage charges. But it might be a good idea to keep track and watch for sudden and significant changes.

    4. Drained resources

    When a virus is running in the background and sending data, it will use up a lot of the device’s processing power, RAM and other resources.

    Many smartphones have tools that show how much of those resources are being used – a big change may be the result of a malware infection.

    5. Strange GPS or Bluetooth use

    Some mobile malware is used to track a victim’s physical location using the device’s GPS or Bluetooth functionality. Therefore, if a phone shows those connections are being used when not running an application that requires them, it could mean a virus is being used to transmit location data.

    6. Unusual disruptions in service

    In addition to stealing data off of a smartphone, hackers may compromise a device in order to listen in on phone calls. Those attempts may cause an unusual amount of dropped calls or service disruptions.

    7. Significant slowdown in performance

    Finally, as with an infected PC, one sign a smartphone may have been infected with malware or otherwise compromised by hackers is that the device just doesn’t run as well as it used to.

    That – as with the other symptoms on this list – can be caused by a number of factors, including some legitimate applications. However, they can also be warning signs that a smartphone has been hacked.



    It’s important that users are aware of what issues to look out for, so the issue can be investigated further if those problems are experienced.



    About the Author: Sam Narisi writes about the latest business technology and IT news as editor in chief of IT Manager Daily.

  3. #103
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    http://news.antiwar.com/2012/10/02/u...o-a-spy/print/

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/...camera-spying/

    http://www.pcworld.com/article/20108...on-people.html


    US Navy Can Turn Your Smartphone Into a Spy

    Is your cellphone spying on you?

    If it isn’t now, it may well be soon, thanks to a new piece of malware developed by the US Navy and called PlaceRaider, which allows them to remotely produce 3D models of whatever room an infected phone is currently in, using the camera and other censors to map out intimate parts of your life.

    The developed app is Android specific, and was shown to be effective at stealing personal financial information, listening in on phone conversations, even stealing keystrokes from a nearby keyboard though the use of the phone’s accelerometer.

    Deploying the app wouldn’t necessarily be all that difficult, as it could be embedded in another app for, say, a popular phone game and the end user would never realize it had been installed, let alone that it was currently running.

    The malware was developed by the Naval Surface Warfare Center with a grant from the National Science Foundation, and is supposed to be a proof of concept of the bad things a criminal could theoretically do with a smartphone virus. At the same time it seems a proof of concept for the bad things the US Navy can already do with its own brand new virus.

    New software uses smartphone camera for spying

    By Shaun Waterman

    -

    The Washington Times

    Tuesday, October 2, 2012

    * ** FILE ** This photo from Feb. 11, 2009, shows an owner beginning to write a text message on his cellphone in Los Angeles. (Associated Press)

    Enlarge Photo

    Researchers from the U.S. Naval Surface Warfare Center have developed malicious software that can remotely seize control of the camera on an infected smartphone and employ it to spy on the phone’s user.

    The malware, dubbed “PlaceRaider,” “allows remote hackers to reconstruct rich, three-dimensional models of the smartphone owner’s personal indoor spaces through completely opportunistic use of the camera,” the researchers said in a study published last week.

    The program uses images from the camera and positional information from the smartphone’s gyroscopic and other sensors to map spaces the phone’s user spends a lot of time in, such as a home or office.

    “Remote burglars” could use these three-dimensional models to “study the environment carefully and steal virtual objects [visible to the camera] … such as as financial documents [or] information on computer monitors,” the researchers reported.

    The program they developed for research purposes easily could be disguised by a malicious user as an app — the programs that run on smartphones — and unwittingly downloaded by victims, according to the study, which first was reported by the newsblog ThreatPost.

    Because users often do not realize that a smartphone is basically a small computer, and because there are few security products available, smartphones are considered highly vulnerable to hackers.

    Commercial software, for instance, can turn smartphones into microphones and tracking devices.

    But PlaceRaider is the first known example of malware developed to exploit the high-definition cameras that are now ubiquitous on smartphones.

    The study was a collaboration between the Navy center team and researchers from the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University.

    Copyright 2012 The Washington Times, LLC. About the Author
    Shaun Waterman
    Shaun Waterman

    Shaun Waterman is an award-winning reporter for The Washington Times, covering foreign affairs, defense and cybersecurity. He was a senior editor and correspondent for United Press International for nearly a decade, and has covered the Department of Homeland Security since 2003. His reporting on the Sept. 11 Commission and the tortuous process by which some of its recommendations finally became ...

    Read more: New software uses smartphone camera for spying - Washington Times http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/...#ixzz28EpDs6kZ
    Follow us: @washtimes on Twitter
    ---
    PlaceRaider app lets phone camera spy on people
    Christina DesMarais @salubriousdish

    * Sep 30, 2012 7:42 AM
    * print

    android malware Malware that runs on Android cell phones and can let attackers perform remote reconnaissance and virtual theft is the handiwork of academic and military researchers.

    They call it "visual malware" dubbed PlaceRaider that uses the phone's camera and other sensors to create three-dimensional models of indoor environments that bad guys could download, study and use to steal "virtual objects" such as financial documents, information on computer monitors, and personal information.

    The software even shuts off the phone’s speaker so someone being spied on doesn’t hear the typical sound a device emits when a photo is taken.

    The app follows up on other nefarious tools created by researchers.

    The Soundminer malware was designed to listen in on phone conversations and use speech recognition to decode credit card and PIN details that users might mention when calling their bank, for example. It also was designed to recognize and decode tones heard when keys are pressed.

    Also, a team of researchers at Georgia Tech created pirate software that used a smartphone accelerometer to steal keystrokes from a nearby keyboard.

    So should you worry about your phone spying on you? Hardly.

    android malware

    These researchers get paid to do this stuff and they have vast resources at their fingertips. While they can prove phones are capable of doing these kinds of tricks, and even if doing so gives real criminals ideas, the average hacker can’t pull off such shenanigans on his own.

    Even if the bad guys could, imagine the vast amount of data they would have to cull through to find a single bank statement you might have displayed on your computer screen that your phone’s camera happened to capture surreptitiously.

    PlaceRaider was created thanks to a grant from the National Science Foundation awarded to researchers from the school of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University in Bloomington, Ind., and the Naval Surface Warfare Center in Crane, Ind.

    Check out the paper (PDF) that outlines, in full, what they accomplished

  4. #104
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    Dear all,

    Could anyone tell me how to patch? it kinda new for me.

    Thank in advance.

  5. #105
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    [Problem] SG8500 with LITE REMIX XXLG1 v3

    Dear all,
    I had flashed my SG8500 with LITE REMIX XXLG1 v3 but I can access only lock screen and other things is blank.
    How come? Do I miss any process?

  6. #106
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    Dear _King_,

    I had flashed my SG8500 with LITE REMIX XXLG1 v3 but I can access only lock screen and the other things is blank.
    How come? Do I miss some process?

    Thanks,

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by AfroVictor View Post
    Dear _King_,

    I had flashed my SG8500 with LITE REMIX XXLG1 v3 but I can access only lock screen and the other things is blank.
    How come? Do I miss some process?

    Thanks,
    The problem is , I guess, you did not choose the right METHOD.. and the correct file for each Item.
    1- When you run Multiloader, make sure you LSI is checked with a dot
    2- you HAVE TO CHecK (click to choose) FULL DOWNLOAD on the menu..
    3- Then carefully choose correct file for each Item. i.e Boot, armss, apps, RSRc1 etc...
    4- Then CLICK DOWNLOAD.. AND WAIT until you see in the LEFT panel says "all files are completely downloaded" ..
    The phone will automatically reset and start..

    Patch files are usually have .pfs as extension name filenamexx.pfs .. So when you patch DO NOT CHECK anything on the main menu. Not "full download, not "master change" no "boot change" ...JUST LEAVE EVERY THING BLANK
    then CLICK PFS (the last item) and choose the Patch file.

  8. #108
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    Hi King, Thanks For the FW!!
    Can you tell me please, how can i get the youtube application? (that you removed)

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by zsamsung View Post
    The problem is , I guess, you did not choose the right METHOD.. and the correct file for each Item.
    1- When you run Multiloader, make sure you LSI is checked with a dot
    2- you HAVE TO CHecK (click to choose) FULL DOWNLOAD on the menu..
    3- Then carefully choose correct file for each Item. i.e Boot, armss, apps, RSRc1 etc...
    4- Then CLICK DOWNLOAD.. AND WAIT until you see in the LEFT panel says "all files are completely downloaded" ..
    The phone will automatically reset and start..

    Patch files are usually have .pfs as extension name filenamexx.pfs .. So when you patch DO NOT CHECK anything on the main menu. Not "full download, not "master change" no "boot change" ...JUST LEAVE EVERY THING BLANK
    then CLICK PFS (the last item) and choose the Patch file.
    Oh great, thank you very much for ur great explanation.

  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by lioneye View Post
    Hi King, Thanks For the FW!!
    Can you tell me please, how can i get the youtube application? (that you removed)
    Pretty easy, you'd basically only have to re-insert the link into the main-menu. I'll explain if you know how to use Wave Remaker and want do do it.

    But, why would you want it? This is not even an application, it is only a www-link which gets opened in Dolfin, and you can also achieve the same by just opening Dolfin.

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